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Glenn Willen

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10:18 am: Interesting: Interactive map of United States road accident deaths, 2001-2009. (They say "casualties", but they mean it in the informal sense of "deaths", not the military sense.)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/interactive/2011/nov/22/us-road-accident-casualties

Things I'm curious about:
- For the pedestrian deaths, which ones were jaywalking? Crossing the street? On the sidewalk?
- For the vehicle occupant deaths, what was the speed of the vehicle at the time of the collision? What was the nature of the collision? (Stationary object, pedestrian/cyclist, motorcycle, head-on, t-bone, read-end, etc.)

I notice that a lot of motorist deaths in collisions that were presumably low-speed (i.e. on small roads) are people over the age of 60 or even higher, and in general older people seem overrepresented in reported vehicular deaths, compared with the rate at which I would expect they drive. I wonder what role was played by poor vision, poor health, or seatbelt refusal.

Comments

From:kartiksg
Date:November 23rd, 2011 09:24 pm (UTC)
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Note that these are casualties and not accidents. I suspect old people are more prone to dying than young people for similar accident circumstances.
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From:gwillen
Date:November 24th, 2011 01:38 am (UTC)
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Right, that's what I was figuring.
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From:bubblingbeebles
Date:November 23rd, 2011 11:01 pm (UTC)
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i remember thinking similar things about cyclist-car collisions when talking about the sidewalk-riding studies (e.g., collisions in intersections were very common, but how many of those are caused by the cyclist not looking for a right-turning car, which i personally always make sure to do?).
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