?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Glenn Willen

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
08:23 pm: Cookies!
I have been doing some experimental baking, and am fond of the following cookie recipe. It's somewhere in the space of linear combinations of the Good Eats / Alton Brown "chewy cookies" and "brownies" recipes.

You will notice that it contains as much brown sugar as it does flour; the resulting cookies are quite sweet, but they don't taste like candy or anything. They are definitely much closer to good bakery cookies than the ones I started with (the Good Eats cookie recipe, which makes cookies that are much too cakey for my tastes.)


Makes about 36 cookies (I have only made half-batches thus far):

[all ounces are volume, not weight]
8 oz butter
4 eggs

16 oz flour (I use all-purpose)
4 oz granulated sugar
16 oz brown sugar (I use dark brown)

1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking soda
3 tsp vanilla (This is pushing it; 1.5 tsp is plenty if you don't love vanilla)

12 oz semisweet chocolate chips


Melt butter; beat in both sugars (Good Eats version uses a food processor on medium for two minutes; I use a spatula); whisk eggs with vanilla, and beat into mixture; add salt and baking soda, and add flour gradually while mixing, until thoroughly combined. Mix in chocolate chips; chill for 1 hour. Bake at 375 for about ten minutes. As they bake, the surface will gradually change from smooth to crinkly; when that change in texture reaches the center of the cookies, they're done (by my standards). If you want them crispy, try giving them another 30 seconds or a minute? I didn't.


The result is much less cakey than the Good Eats version. (The fact that I substituted AP for bread flour when making their version may make my evaluation unfair.) It's pretty chewy (in the gooey sense, like brownies, rather than the cakey sense), but still kind of weirdly fluffy. I haven't decided whether I like this better than the denser, brownie-like texture of what I think of as "commercial cookies", which is what I was aiming for.

Comments

[User Picture]
From:bubblingbeebles
Date:December 10th, 2011 09:10 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I still think in cups; I need to break this habit...
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 10th, 2011 11:01 pm (UTC)
(Link)
When I was comparing various cookie recipes, I went ahead and converted everything to ounces for the sake of even comparison. It seemed easiest to keep it that way. With 3 tsp to the tbsp, 2 tbsp to the oz, and 8 oz to the cup, it's pretty easy to just work in oz for everything (though I did spare the stuff that's conventionally done in tsp, since 1/3 is annoying.)
[User Picture]
From:bubblingbeebles
Date:December 11th, 2011 12:06 am (UTC)
(Link)
Yeah, I run into this too when I blend various recipes to figure out how to bake something new, only I always convert to cups. I should just get a kitchen scale and teach myself the right way. :P
[User Picture]
From:jibb
Date:December 11th, 2011 03:37 am (UTC)
(Link)
Ah, so your flour and sugar measurements are fluid ounces of volume, not weight measurements?
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 11th, 2011 03:42 am (UTC)
(Link)
Yeah, that should probably have been made clear. It's all floz.
[User Picture]
From:bubblingbeebles
Date:December 11th, 2011 09:36 pm (UTC)
(Link)
ohh, that is not the way and the light either :P
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 11th, 2011 09:45 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Well, I have no practical way to measure by weight....
[User Picture]
From:jgrafton
Date:December 12th, 2011 09:04 am (UTC)
(Link)
I hear there are these magical devices that have solved this problem.
[User Picture]
From:jgrafton
Date:December 12th, 2011 09:06 am (UTC)
(Link)
I'm not sure which is worse: that American cookbooks always list ingredients by volume rather than by weight, or that we're still using Imperial measurements instead of metric.
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 10th, 2011 11:03 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Also, doing everything in oz makes it easier to divide and multiply on the fly.
[User Picture]
From:_tove
Date:December 10th, 2011 11:32 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Have you tried the standard back-of-the-bag Nestle Tollhouse cookies recipe? They are pretty much my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe (better than either of the America's Test Kitchen recipes, omg sacrilege), and the texture is very classic chewy-in-the-middle with crispy/caramelized edges.
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 11th, 2011 01:17 am (UTC)
(Link)
Hmm, that is basically the same recipe as the Good Eats one (he says as much in the episode). I find that the kind of chewy they are is dryish and cakey, rather than moist and gooey. I may have been cooking them too long, which is a good point; I did mine by sight, whereas those I did by the number of minutes it said in the recipe.
[User Picture]
From:_tove
Date:December 11th, 2011 01:31 am (UTC)
(Link)
The one you post above has twice as many eggs and almost twice as much flour per butter, which would make a big textural difference. If anything, I'd suspect that the Tollhouse ones are a lot more moist, since there's more butter. Also, melting the butter first is likely to make them denser, since softened + "creamed" (beaten until fluffy) butter incorporates air.

If they're not gooey, you're almost certainly baking them too long. I bake just until the edges are medium brown.
[User Picture]
From:bubblingbeebles
Date:December 11th, 2011 05:12 am (UTC)
(Link)
The tollhouse recipe is my cookie recipe's grand-recipe.
[User Picture]
From:_tove
Date:December 11th, 2011 01:41 am (UTC)
(Link)
Oh also, if you want sometime with actually exactly the texture of brownies, you should try looking for a "blondies" recipe. As far as I can tell, blondies are chocolate-chip-flavored brownies, so mostly vanilla/brown sugar, with chocolate chips. The book has a version, but I've never tried it.
[User Picture]
From:gwillen
Date:December 11th, 2011 01:50 am (UTC)
(Link)
So, I looked at blondies, but they had an even _higher_ flouer/butter ratio than mine, let alone the tollhouse cookies.

I think what may actually responsible for mine being denser is that I halved the baking soda. I may try going back to Tollhouse and making no other changes than that, and see what comes out.
[User Picture]
From:cdinwood
Date:December 11th, 2011 04:35 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I think cooking for a little less time than recommended is a good suggestion for getting chewier cookies in general. Also it is very easy to do.
Powered by LiveJournal.com